Tag Archives: agricultural education

official, unofficial, whatever

I took the “Institute” out of my blog’s name. A while back, a year or two, maybe, I put it in there, probably unnoticed. That’s what this place where I live is officially called. Rainshadow Farm Institute. On my unfinished … Continue reading

Posted in agroecology, community, eco-art, ethnobotany, Life changes, socioecological intelligence, sustainability education | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Weeds and more (much more, in fact, really long)

Erodium cicutarium, usually known as red-stemmed filaree or common stork’s-bill, is native to the Mediterranean region and was introduced to California in the eighteenth century. There is archaeological evidence for the presence of red-stemmed filaree in adobe bricks from the … Continue reading

Posted in agroecology, Anthropology, climate change, ethnobotany, family, Nature, resilience, sustainable agriculture, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

earth art

I’ve been thinking about earth art in the desert. At RSF we “collaborated” with the soil to produce paintings on canvas. I would like to see more art installations at Rainshadow Farm. Earth art or earthworks are perfect for a … Continue reading

Posted in art, eco-art, Nature, sustainability education | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

What led me to the farming life

1. The land: West Virginia, the Kanawha Valley and surrounding hills and mountains. The people there. Ohio, northwest, remnants of ancient wet prairie land, dry oak savanna, and forested ravines, the city, the river, my own backyard where I began … Continue reading

Posted in family, gratitude, heritage, Nature, sustainable agriculture | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

High Desert Habitat Restoration

I’m thinking about doing some more intensive habitat restoration right here at RSF. There are native plants that grow within a mile or two of here on undeveloped land. Harvesting some seeds is probably fine to do, if the land … Continue reading

Posted in dryland restoration, sustainability education, sustainable agriculture | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Ecological Benefits of Agroecology by UC Berkeley Professor Miguel Altieri | Food First/Institute for Food and Development Policy

The Ecological Benefits of Agroecology by UC Berkeley Professor Miguel Altieri | Food First/Institute for Food and Development Policy. Agroecology — I’m grateful for Miguel Altieri. He is one of the main academic voices for agroecology but he has a … Continue reading

Posted in socioecological intelligence, sustainability education, sustainable agriculture | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Squirrel and rabbit-proofing the high desert garden

In the southwestern Mojave Desert ground squirrels of various species and rabbits will eat a garden as soon as it sprouts. They will consume leaves and unripe fruit from orchard trees as well. This may seem unusual since the genus … Continue reading

Posted in sustainability education, sustainable agriculture | Tagged , , | 2 Comments